Student Leaders Program Returns to the Museum

For the third year, the Museum is honored to be participating in the Student Leaders Program (formerly called U.S.-Middle East Partnership Initiative or MEPI)—a partnership with Portland State University. The highly competitive program selects students from countries throughout the Middle East and North Africa. They spend six weeks in the United States, including three weeks in Portland at PSU, where they develop leadership skills and expand their understanding of civil society. Upon completion of the U.S.-based programs, host institutes work with participants to implement civic engagement programs in their home communities.

Every Student Leader brings a unique and compelling perspective to the program. Jabr Asmew, a medical student from Benghazi, Libya aspires to work for Doctors Without Borders. Joelle Nassif from Beirut, who has a double degree in Law and Political Science, has worked with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees to resettle Syrian refugees in Lebanon and contemplates a career in politics and journalism. Rosa Ouarda Benlakhlef is a 22-year-old student from Algeria who aspires to be a TEFL teacher, a motivational speaker, a social activist, a writer, and much more. Describing herself as restless and driven, she knows she will find a way to make all her dreams come true. The Museum shares this same faith in all of the Student Leaders.

Of the consortium of universities that receive grant funding for the program, Portland is the only site that partners with an art museum—offering students unique opportunities to learn from Museum staff, artists, and educators. The art museum provides a space for critical conversations as well as personal stories, where students explore big ideas such as the role of dissent in democracy and also have intimate conversations around identity and our understanding of home.

This year, students are focusing on artwork related to both Portland and the United States. They met with Ka’ila Farrell-Smith, a Portland-based Klamath/Modoc artist, activist, and educator, to discuss indigenous art, cultural identity, and decolonization. Ka’ila guided students through the Native American art galleries, focusing particularly on the work of contemporary artists, such as Lillian Pitt and Joe Feddersen. Students also had the opportunity to discuss art and social justice through works in the Museum’s permanent collection and learn about collaborative initiatives to address Portland’s housing crisis through affordable, sustainable, tiny houses as part of the Quest for Beauty exhibition Plywood POD Initiative.

During the third and final session, the students will have the opportunity to discuss art, race, and democratic practice via the forthcoming exhibition, Representing: Vernacular Photographs of, by, and for African Americans.

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Portland Art Museum

Museum Responds to the Proposed NEA, NEH, and IMLS cuts

The Portland Art Museum joins museums and cultural institutions across the country in opposition to the proposed elimination of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). The arts are essential to our shared humanity and provide unparalleled opportunities for reflection, creative expression, and most importantly, connection to each other.

Art impacts people of all ages and from all backgrounds, and the Museum provides the space and resources that make that impact felt even more deeply—from focused programs for children and people living with dementia, to tours for visitors who are blind or partially sighted, and lectures for all. Our education and public programs inspire as well as offer tools that turn art into powerful lessons on history and empathy. School field trip tours open up new horizons to students and give them a broader sense of their place in the world. Each new exhibition and program offers a new opportunity to form lasting community partnerships that further extend the impact that the Museum is able to make.

The NEA, NEH, and IMLS have been vital partners in our ability to serve our community—locally and nationally. Funding has supported increased access to the Native American and Northwest art collections, as well as Northwest Film Center education and exhibition programs, among many other projects. The NEA’s crucial indemnity program for exhibitions and loans of artwork has made it possible to present many masterworks in Portland. Additionally, through the Oregon Arts Commission, the NEA provides operating support to the Museum.

The support that the Museum and other local and regional organizations have received from the NEA, NEH, and IMLS has helped to shape the dynamic cultural and civic environment that we hold dear. The Portland Art Museum strongly urges Congress to continue funding these agencies, whose work sustains our quality of life and provides real economic value across the country. Our experiences with art create a shared sense of community, nationality, and ultimately humanity—something more important now than ever.

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Portland Art Museum

Support Education at the Museum

Join us for our Spring Annual Appeal campaign in support of the public programming that surrounds each of our exhibitions. Exhibitions at the Portland Art Museum are enhanced by a wide assortment of educational activities, lectures, tours, community partnerships, and interactive media projects. Each year we reach 60,000 students, families, and community-members through our educational programming—nearly double the national average for museums.

And we want to do more! We are thrilled to announce that an incredible supporter of the Portland Art Museum and our education programs – the Maybelle Clark Macdonald Fund – has offered us a generous matching gift of $ 25,000! All gifts between $ 150 and $ 1,000 will be matched, doubling the impact and helping the Portland Art Museum continue to serve as a vital educational and cultural resource for our entire region, now and for future generations.

Donate Now

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Portland Art Museum

Museum Responds to the Proposed NEA, NEH, and IMLS cuts

The Portland Art Museum joins museums and cultural institutions across the country in opposition to the proposed elimination of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). The arts are essential to our shared humanity and provide unparalleled opportunities for reflection, creative expression, and most importantly, connection to each other.

Art impacts people of all ages and from all backgrounds, and the Museum provides the space and resources that make that impact felt even more deeply—from focused programs for children and people living with dementia, to tours for visitors who are blind or partially sighted, and lectures for all. Our education and public programs inspire as well as offer tools that turn art into powerful lessons on history and empathy. School field trip tours open up new horizons to students and give them a broader sense of their place in the world. Each new exhibition and program offers a new opportunity to form lasting community partnerships that further extend the impact that the Museum is able to make.

The NEA, NEH, and IMLS have been vital partners in our ability to serve our community—locally and nationally. Funding has supported increased access to the Native American and Northwest art collections, as well as Northwest Film Center education and exhibition programs, among many other projects. The NEA’s crucial indemnity program for exhibitions and loans of artwork has made it possible to present many masterworks in Portland. Additionally, through the Oregon Arts Commission, the NEA provides operating support to the Museum.

The support that the Museum and other local and regional organizations have received from the NEA, NEH, and IMLS has helped to shape the dynamic cultural and civic environment that we hold dear. The Portland Art Museum strongly urges Congress to continue funding these agencies, whose work sustains our quality of life and provides real economic value across the country. Our experiences with art create a shared sense of community, nationality, and ultimately humanity—something more important now than ever.

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Portland Art Museum

Museum partners with Potluck in the Park for a Free Christmas Dinner

For the third year in row, the Museum is partnering with Potluck in the Park for a free Christmas day dinner. The event also includes gifts, phone calls, photos with Santa, and live jazz music.

Portland Art Museum Executive Director and Chief Curator Brian Ferriso, who volunteers with his family at the event, said, “we are honored to partner with Potluck in the Park to host a Free Christmas Dinner again this year. When Potluck in the Park leadership approached the Museum three years ago to host the annual event, due to the closing of the YWCA, we knew it was something we wanted to do. The Portland Art Museum aspires to be a resource for all and we are honored that our celebrated facilities and collections can be used to serve those most in need.   It is truly a unique opportunity for the Museum and Potluck in the Park to not only nourish bodies, but also souls.”

Read more from the organizers of the event below.

Potluck in the Park is hosting its Free Christmas Dinner for the 23nd year.  Portland’s largest Christmas Dinner will be served on Christmas Day at the Portland Art Museum.  The dinner is open to anyone in need or anyone without friends or family to spend the holiday with.  Over 400 volunteers will help feed and gift more than 1000 guests.  The doors will be open for three hours from 1:00 to 4:00pm to make sure everyone is fed.

Guests will dine on a traditional holiday meal in the Art Museum’s Fred and Suzanne Fields Ballroom.  Dinner will be accompanied by live jazz from Tom Grant and Patrick Lamb and friends.  Guests can receive a photo of themselves with Santa and make free phone calls to loved ones.

Guests will also receive socks filled with goodies by Cathedral Elementary School students and warm wear collected by Fred Meyer employees and others.  Kennels for guests’ pets will be available during the meal and pet food will be distributed courtesy of the Pongo Fund.

Major contributors to the event include: The Hilton Hotel, DoubleTree Hotel, Peter Corvallis Productions, West Coast Event Productions, Classic Pianos, DeAngelo’s Catering & Events, Brattain International, Fred Meyer Employees and the more than 200 student elves of Cathedral School who joyfully stuffed more than 1000 pairs of socks.

ABOUT Potluck in the Park

Potluck in the Park is an all-volunteer non-profit organization in its 26th year of providing nutritious meals to anyone in need EVERY Sunday, rain or shine, at O’Bryant Square in Downtown Portland.  They have served meals for 1323 consecutive Sundays since 1991.

Potluck in the Park’s mission is to nourish and enrich the lives of individuals by providing a free hot meal  and a safe community gathering place every Sunday. Potluck volunteers believe in treating everyone with dignity, respect, friendliness and kindness. It goes a long way in helping build self-esteem and a sense of self-worth in many of their guests.

The group began serving Christmas Dinner at the YWCA the first year after they started that Christmas fell on a Sunday in 1994.  It became a Christmas Day tradition soon after.

In 2012 Potluck in the Park volunteers were awarded the Oregon Governor’s Volunteer Regional Award for Outstanding Lifetime Achievement.

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Portland Art Museum

Museum Expands with the Rothko Pavilion

A New Building – the Rothko Pavilion – will Unify the Museum’s Campus and Create a New Community Commons Free and Open to the Public, as Well as New Exhibition Spaces and a Rooftop Deck and Sculpture Garden

Rothko Pavilion illustration

View of the east entrance plaza. Courtesy of Vinci Hamp Architects.

The Portland Art Museum today announced both an expansion that will unify its campus by connecting the Museum’s freestanding buildings, and a 20-year partnership with the children of Mark Rothko, Christopher Rothko, and Kate Rothko Prizel. The partnership includes the loan to the Museum of major paintings by Mark Rothko from their private collection; paintings will be loaned individually in rotation over the course of the next two decades.

The expansion will feature a new glass-walled building, to be named the Rothko Pavilion, in recognition of the artist’s legacy in Portland—his home as a youth after immigrating from Latvia—and the Museum, where he took art classes as a teenager and where he received his first solo exhibition. The naming was made possible thanks to the $ 8 million lead gift from a donor who wished to remain anonymous so the pavilion could be named in Mark Rothko’s honor.

The expansion project will seamlessly link the Museum to the surrounding Cultural District with a new central entrance flanked by greenery and sculpture that opens onto the South Park Blocks. The project will make the Museum more publicly accessible, while knitting the campus together with the surrounding neighborhood and reducing the Museum’s carbon footprint. Groundbreaking is scheduled to take place in 2018, with an expected completion date for the project in late 2020 or early 2021. The Museum is launching the public phase of a $ 75-million capital and endowment campaign to fund the project. To date, $ 21.75 million (43 percent) of the $ 50-million capital goal has been raised, and $ 5.4 million has been raised towards the $ 25-million endowment goal.

“The partnership with the Rothko family is a homecoming of sorts, enabling us to share with the public major works from the family’s private collection, offer new insight into Rothko’s practice, and honor his legacy in the Pacific Northwest and the international arts community,” said Brian Ferriso, The Marilyn H. and Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr. Director and Chief Curator. “We are deeply appreciative of Christopher and Kate’s extraordinary generosity in sharing these works with the people of Portland, the state of Oregon, and visitors to our city. Our plans for the Rothko Pavilion bring together the elements of the Portland Art Museum’s mission: to present exceptional works of art, develop exhibitions that take new perspectives on human creativity, and increase public accessibility and inclusion.”

“Our family is thrilled to enter into this partnership with the Museum,” said Christopher Rothko. “Portland played a formative role in my father’s youth, and we are eager to share these works with the public and give Rothko a more active role in the vibrant cultural life of this city.  Our hope is that visitors will take the time to pause and engage with each of these paintings, and to participate in the process of ‘slow looking’ that the Museum has championed.”

Designed by Chicago-based Vinci Hamp Architects, the three-story Rothko Pavilion will add roughly 30,000 square feet of space to the Museum and will be anchored by a glass-walled stair tower that will connect the Pavilion to the Museum’s Main Building. In addition to the Community Commons, the Pavilion will feature 9,840 square feet of new gallery space, including space for contemporary and media art, as well as a new Education and Design Lab, and new space for the Museum’s library. The project will also create a third-floor sculpture garden that will provide visitors the chance to step outside and enjoy the Museum’s natural surroundings; the rooftop deck will also serve as a space for public programming and events. The paintings loaned by Christopher and Kate Rothko Prizel will be installed in light-controlled galleries adjacent to the new Rothko Pavilion.

“As we look forward to the next 125 years, we look to strengthen our connection between the Museum and the public it serves,” said Janet Geary, Chairman of the Portland Art Museum Board of Trustees. “Our campaign will connect building to building, the Museum to the community, people to art and to each other.”

Architect Vinci Hamp’s previous work includes projects for the Art Institute of Chicago, the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach, the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum and the Neue Galerie in New York, the Milwaukee Art Museum, and the Oriental Institute, Smart Museum of Art, and The Arts Club in Chicago, among others. Also known for their historic preservation work, Vinci Hamp has completed award-winning projects that include the Illinois State Capitol, Chicago Tribune Tower, and Frank Lloyd Wright’s Home and Studio.

The Portland Art Museum has mounted exhibitions by a diverse roster of artists since the time of its founding. In 1913, the Museum brought works from the famous New York Armory Show to Portland, helping to introduce West Coast audiences to Modernism. In 1933 the Museum organized the first solo exhibition of works by the 29-year-old artist Marcus Rothkowitz, later to be known as Mark Rothko.

Ferriso joined the Portland Art Museum in 2006, and in 2016 was appointed President of the Association of Art Museum Directors. During his tenure at the Museum, Ferriso has helped to build a $ 4-million endowment dedicated for initiatives to increase public accessibility, enabling one-third of all visitors to receive free or reduced admission and supporting the Museum’s program of free school tours and free admissions for those 17 and under. He has also doubled the Museum’s curatorial staff, with four curatorial positions fully endowed at $ 2 million each, and greatly expanded the Museum’s development of original exhibitions. Under his leadership, the Museum has presented notable exhibitions including a major Mark Rothko retrospective in 2012, as well as Wild Beauty: Photographs of the Columbia Gorge, 1867–1957 (2008), featuring works by Carleton E. Watkins, Lily White, and Sarah Ladd, among others; Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video (2013), a solo exhibition by the Portland native; Contemporary Native Photographers and the Edward Curtis Legacy: Zig Jackson, Wendy Red Star, Will Wilson (2016); The Enclave: Richard Mosse (201415) featuring work by the Irish contemporary conceptual photographer; The Question of Hope: Robert Adams in Western Oregon (201314); and Josh Kline: Freedom, which is currently on view. Ferriso has also focused on transparency and accountability to the Museum’s community, including a commitment to the tradition of annual Board Meetings open to the full Museum membership and attended by hundreds of members of the public.

 

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Portland Art Museum

Museum Chief Advancement Officer Given Fundraising Award

The Portland Art Museum is proud to announce that Chief Advancement Officer, J.S. May, was nominated and selected for the “Allan Price Award for Distinguished Service to the Fundraising Profession” by the Association of Fundraising Professionals of Oregon and SW Washington.

A seasoned fundraising and communications professional, J.S. has worked for a wide range of nonprofit organizations, including Doernbecher Children’s Hospital Foundation at Oregon Health and Science University and Oregon Public Broadcasting. He has also served on the boards of the Portland Schools Foundation, the Creative Advocacy Coalition, and Cycle Oregon. Hired at the Museum in 2007 as director of development, at the beginning of the economic downturn, J.S. jumped into the vital work of fostering the sources of funding that would allow the Museum to fulfill and even expand its mission in the community while strengthening the institution’s financial stability.

He will be honored at the 30th Annual Philanthropy Awards Luncheon on November 7. The Allan Price Award was established in 2012 to recognize fundraising professionals who demonstrate exceptional skill and enthusiasm for their work, who pursue big ideas and successfully engage others in achieving them, and who inspire new levels of giving among donors, ultimately making Oregon and southwest Washington better through their efforts.

J.S. was nominated by Portland Art Museum Trustees Pat Green, Kathleen Lewis and Angela Snow.

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Portland Art Museum

Labor Day Weekend at the Museum

Native Fashion Now—Last chance to catch the splendid summer exhibition celebrating more than 70 indigenous designers from across the United States and Canada.

Case Work: Studies in Form, Space & Construction by Brad Cloepfil/Allied Works ArchitectureTake one more look at this intricate installation exploring the sculptures and drawings of the celebrated Portland architect and his firm.

The annual Employee Art Show (September 1–4) is an opportunity for Museum employees to showcase their artistic talents. For the first time, works will be on view, and available for purchase at the Rental Sales Gallery.

Celebrate the art of Coast Salish Weaving with the opening of Restoring the Breath—Sacred Relationship in the Center for Contemporary Native Art, and join us for weaving demonstrations on Saturday, September 3 from noon – 3:00 p.m.

Participate in the traveling Truth Booth project on Saturday, September 3 from 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

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Portland Art Museum

Shop Native Fashion Now designers at the Museum Store

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From skateboard decks to pendants and scarves, Native Fashion Now accessories, gifts, and home goods from the designers featured in the exhibition are available for purchase at the Museum Store.

Celebrate street style with Jared Yazzie’s outspoken Native Americans Discovered Columbus t-shirt, Alona Edzerza’s bold hoodies, and Crystal Worl’s breathtaking skateboard decks. Straight out of the exhibition, bring these unique street fashions home with you.

Also on offer are one-of-a-kind, exquisite pieces that are works of art themselves. Designer Patricia Michaels, who was also featured on the show Project Runway, used her couture roots to create hand-painted silk scarfs as a way for everyone to be able to take her unique and personal art home with them.

Jewelry designers Wendy Ponca and Jamie Okuma use native materials, designs, and methods like intricate beading, raw leather, and abalone to create breathtaking accessories.

Shop these, plus many more extraordinary designs from Native Fashion Now artists. Plus, don’t forget, Museum members receive a 10% discount.

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Portland Art Museum

Holiday Concepts: The Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, Tucson, Arizona

The Arizona-Sonora Desert Gallery stands at 2021 North Kinney Road, in Tucson, Arizona 85743 It is a world-renowned zoo, organic past museum and also organic yard. The Sonoran Desert is an arid area partially of Arizona, The golden state of California and also the Mexican states of Sonora as well as Baja The golden state. The museum includes informative screens of living animals as well as plants indigenous to the Sonoran Desert. The Museum has functioned given that September 1, 1952.

Facts about Arizona: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arizona

Jeopardized and also threatened varieties on exhibition feature:

  • Mexican wolf
  • Thick-billed parrot
  • Ocelot
  • Margay
  • Jaguarondi
  • Desert pupfish
  • Sonora chub
  • Ponytail chub
  • Razorback chump
  • Gila topminnow
  • Colorado River squawfish
  • Isla San Esteban chuckwalla
  • Apache trout

The littlest pet is the leafcutter ants and also the most extensive creature is the American black bear. The oldest non-living animal at the Museum is actually the Sonorasaurus dinosaur dating from the Cretaceous.
You can easily plan to invest at minimum 2 to 3 hours visiting the Desert Museum. Due to the fact that the Desert Gallery is mainly an exterior experience, you ought to organize on putting on a hat, some really good sunblock as well as comfy footwears, or even proper cooler climate clothes throughout colder amount of times of the year. All in the house exhibits are cooled down.
Wheelchairs and also baby strollers are offered complimentary. There are actually two energy scooter-style tire office chairs accessible for $10 daily.
There are trained Museum volunteers capable that can help you obtain a better understanding of the complex relationships in between the plants, animals and the natural surroundings of the Sonoran Desert.
Museum Hours

The Museum levels daily of the year:

  • Summer months Saturday Evenings: 7:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. (June– August).
  • March– September: 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (no entry after 4:15 p.m.).
  • Oct– February: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (no admittance after 4:15 p.m.).

Museum Entrance Prices.

  • June– August: $9 Adults, $2 Youngsters 6– 12.
  • September – May: $12 Grownups, $4 Little ones 6– 12.
  • Youngsters 5 as well as under are actually FREE.

The exhibits at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Gallery remodel the natural landscape of the Sonoran Desert Area very truthfully. You may experience eye-to-eye exchange hill cougars, pasturage canines, Gila monsters and more. There are much more than 300 creature types and also 1,200 type of plants, as effectively as practically 2 miles of paths traversing 21 acreages of the desert. The Museum’s primary purpose is to inspire people to inhabit tranquility along with the environment by encouraging passion, gratitude as well as understanding of the Sonoran Desert.

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